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Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

The Bulletin 
of the 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

James A. Graham, Commissioner 
Number 235, May 1979 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Foreword 3 

The Bottom Four Leaves Crisis 4 

Tobacco Outlook 1979 , 5 

Cigarettes Bear Highest Tax 6 

Quality— Key to Flue-Cured Tobacco Future 8 

State Market Summary 1978-79 10 

Selling Flue-Cured Tobacco In 1000 Pound Bales 12 

Summary of N. C. Dealers and Warehouse Resales 13 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured 
Tobacco by States 1978 13 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of N. C 14 

Burley Movement In and Out of N. C 14 

Flue-Cured Stabilization Receipts 

By Types and Markets— 1 978 15 

Burley Stabilization Receipts For 

N. C. and Total U. S. 1978-79 15 

N. C. Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report 
For Season 1978-79 16 

N. C. Burley Crops 1930-1978 18 

N. C. Flue-Cured Crops 1930-1978 19 

N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments— 1979 20 

N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments— 1979 22 

N. C. Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

By Types and Markets— 1978 23 

Tobacco Organizations and Agencies 30 

N. C. Board of Agriculture 31 

Domestic Tax Paid Cigarette Consumption 
By Kinds 1978 32 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Affairs Section, 

Division of Marketing, North Carolina Department 

of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 

Curtis F. Tarleton, Director, Division of Marketing 
John H. Cyrus, Chief, Tobacco Affairs Section 
Bobby R. Gentry, Tobacco Marketing Specialist 



Foreword 




The Thirtieth Annual issue of the 
North Carolina Tobacco Report has 
been edited by J. H. Cyrus, Chief of 
Tobacco Affairs Section, and Bobby 
R. Gentry, Tobacco Marketing Spe- 
cialist, Division of Marketing, North 
Carolina Department of Agriculture. 
Mr. Cyrus, who was the second 
Tobacco Marketing Specialist to be 
hired by the Department, organized 
and started publishing the Tobacco 
Report in 1949 during his first year 
with the State Department of Agri- 
culture. Down through the past 30 years the contents of this publi- 
cation has been expanded to include information and data of cur- 
rent interest and value to all segments of the entire tobacco indus- 
try. 

Every year it seems that tobacco is faced with a crisis situation. 
This year's tobacco problem is one that should cause a major con- 
cern to every flue-cured tobacco grower, because it is a threat to his 
price support program. The current problem stems from a surplus 
of around 200 million pounds of priming (P) and nondescript (N) 
tobacco from the bottom of the stalk now held by Stabilization. At 
the present time there seems to be little or no demand for these P 
and N grades in Stabilization stocks because it is a domestic type 
tobacco, and most domestic companies have bought their needs 
from the warehouse floor. 

Thus, it appears that it is up to each tobacco grower to eliminate 
these low P and N grades from the auction sale in order to create a 
domestic demand for the surplus P and N grades now held by the 
grower owned Stabilization. It is imperative that Stabilization sell 
this bottom stalk tobacco within the next year or two or the farmer 
owned Stabilization will surely suffer severe losses on this tobacco, 
which could mean sure death to the farmer's price support program. 
Therefore, I urge all flue-cured tobacco growers to leave their 
bottom 4 leaves in the field in 1979, whether you have signed up in 
the 4-leaf program or not. We have reached the point where all 
growers may have to make a sacrifice in order to save his price 
support program. 

As in the past we recognize the following agencies and organiza- 
tions for their contribution of some of the data in this publication: 
The Cooperative Crop Reporting Service; Agricultural Marketing 
Service, USDA; Flue-Cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization; 
and the Tobacco Tax Council. 





Commissioner of Agriculture 



The Bottom Four Leaves Crisis 



Commissioner of Agriculture, Jim Graham, urgently warns flue- 
cured tobacco growers that the time is at hand when they may have 
to sacrifice any short term gains from harvesting the bottom 4 
leaves, in order to maintain the life supporting long range benefits 
from their tobacco price support program, which has stabilized 
prices and kept them in business for more than 45 years. 

The 200 million pounds of bottom stalk priming and nondescript 
grades held by Stabilization presents the most serious threat to the 
tobacco price support program sincethechangetoacreage pound- 
age in 1965, which was necessary in order to control the build up of 
a record surplus and improve quality. It should be emphasized that 
unless this surplus of P and N tobacco can be sold within the next 
year or two, it will almost surely have to be sold at a great loss to 
Stabilization, because of the high interest rates. 

The problem stems from the fact that these bottom stalk P and N 
grades are strictly domestic tobacco with no apparent export 
demand, and growers have marketed considerably more of this 
tobacco than the domestic trade could absorb. Thus, in order to 
create a market demand for this two and one-half years surplus of P 
and N tobacco held by Stabilization, growers must withhold this 
bottom stalk tobacco from the market by leaving the bottom 4 leaves 
in the field. 

It cannot be over emphasized that this problem of surplus bottom 
stalk tobacco has developed into a crisis situation that could 
destroy the price support program. All flue-cured tobacco growers 
must be brought to the realization that once their farmer owned 
Stabilization starts loosing money and fails to repay the Commodity 
Credit Corporation loans, the price support to growers will then 
become a subsidy paid for with tax money. If this happens, with all 
of the anti-tobacco moves in the nation today, it will be very difficult 
for the tobacco state delegations in the U. S. Congress to get 
enough backing from their colleagues from non-tobacco states to 
continue funds for the tobacco price support program. 

Mr. Tobacco Farmer, 1979 has brought your price support pro- 
gram to another cross roads. Before you start your 1979 flue-cured 
harvest, STOP! and THINK! Which road will you take, the road to 
future stability paved with the bottom 4 leaves left in the field to 
strengthen your price support program, or the dead end road made 
more bumpy by the harvesting and marketing of bottom stalk 
tobacco, which will add to the surplus and could lead to the tragic 
wreck of the price support program? So, whether you have signed 
up to leave the bottom 4 leaves or not, you are urged to participate 
in leaving the bottom stalk leaves in the field in 1979 for your own 
future economic welfare. 



Tobacco Outlook — 1979 



The 1979 crops of flue-cured and burley tobacco will be smaller 
than in 1978. Based on growers intention of planting, the 1979 flue- 
cured crop will be about 10 percent smaller and the burley crop 
about 3 percent less than last years. 

The effective U. S. flue-cured quota for 1979 is 1,070 million 
pounds compared to 1,182 million in 1978. The effective burley 
quota is 652 million pounds down slightly from the 668 million of 
the previous year. The beginning carryoverstocksof flue-cured will 
be up about 2 percent at the start of the 1979 marketing season, 
because of the large 1978 crop. However, the total supply of flue- 
cured for the 1979 market year will be down more than 100 million 
pounds due to a smaller 1979 crop. There will be practically no 
change in the burley carryover stocks at the beginning of the 1979 
market year, nor the total supply based on the burley quota and 
expected production for 1979. 

In North Carolina, the 1979 effective quota of flue-cured is 706 
million pounds, down from 797 million last year. North Carolina 
growers sold 102 percent of their effective quota in 1978, which 
amounted to 810 million pounds. Thus, North Carolina will likely 
sell around 100 million pounds less tobacco in 1979 even if they 
produce 100 percent of their quota. 

Even with a much shorter flue-cured crop, N. C. growers have the 
potential for another good year in 1979. However, the outlook 
hinges on another favorable growing season that will produce a 
good quality crop to meet the export and domestic demand for 
quality tobacco. With an 8 cents per pound increase in the average 
price support which pushed it up to $129.30 per hundred, and the 
prospects for a strong market demand that is expected to set a new 
record market average price. North Carolina flue-cured growers will 
probably produce another billion dollarcrop in 1979, but it will likely 
fall short of last year's record $1,080 million. 

The 1979 N. C. effective burley quota will remain at last year's 
level of about 27 million pounds. However, around 7 million pounds 
of this quota has not been produced during recent years. The survey 
on intentions of planting by burley growers indicate they will plant 
200 acres less in 1979than in 1978. Nevertheless, with an increase in 
the burley price support to $133.30 per hundred, N. C. burley grow- 
ers will likely set a new record market average price and a record 
gross income of around $27 million from their 1979 burley crop. 



Cigarettes Bear The Highest Tax 

By J. H. Cyrus 

Almost without exception, cigarettes bear the highest tax of any 
item the United States consumer buys, according to data compiled 
by the Tobaco Tax Council. Nearly one-half of the average per pack 
cost of cigarettes sold throughout the nation goes for federal, state 
and local cigarette taxes. Also, in many jurisdictions, a sales tax is 
placed on top of all the other taxes. 

If it were not for these burdensome taxes, consumers throughout 
the United States would pay only 28 cents a pack or $2.80 per carton 
for their cigarettes. This price would cover all of the cost of produc- 
tion and provide a reasonable profit for everyone involved in bring- 
ing cigarettes to the marketplace, including the farmer, the manu- 
facturers, the wholesaler and the retailer. With the high taxes, a car- 
ton of cigarettes ranges generally from about $3.70 to $6.60 de- 
pending on the state in which they were purchased. This means that 
the individual who smokes a pack a day can pay anywhere from 
$40.00 to $116.00 more a year in taxes than his nonsmoking neigh- 
bor. Yet, the smoker gets no more returns from the additional taxes 
than the nonsmoker. 

Information compiled by the Tobacco Tax Council shows that if 
all goods and services were taxed at the same rate as cigarettes, 
their cost would be increased on an average by 79 percent. For 
example, at those rates a $6000 automobile would cost $1 0,740, and 
a $600 television set would sell for $1,074, a $50 watch would be 
priced at $89.50, and a 20 cent bar of candy would cost 36 cents. If 
all things were taxed at this rate, Americans would be able to buy 
only the bare necessities of life. 

The adjoining chart shows thedistribution of theconsumerdollar 
for cigarettes. It is quite noticeable that tobacco growers only re- 
ceive 8.4 cents of the consumer dollar, while taxes take up 38.8 
cents of the dollar. When all cigarette taxes at all levels were col- 
lected for fiscal year 1978, the grand total was over six billion 
dollars. 

Since North Carolina grows more tobacco and manufactures 
more cigarettes than any other state, it is considered the anchor 
state in the fight to curb the rise in cigarette taxes nationwide. It is 
noticeable that since North Carolina has held the line on cigarette 
tax in recent years, there have been fewer increases in cigarette 
taxes throughout the 50 states and local jurisdiction. 

Thus, it behooves North Carolina to take the lead in holding the 
line on cigarette tax, because an increase in this state would likely 
set off another round of cigarette tax increases throughout the 
nation, which would price cigarettes out of reach of many more 
customers. Of course, any decline in consumption would reduce 
the demand for the farmer's tobacco, which would result in a loss in 
his income. 




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Quality — Key to Flue-Cured Tobacco Future 



When Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. and his task force visited 
Europe in the spring of 1978, they visited several tobacco com- 
panies to put in a plug for North Carolina tobacco. They were ex- 
pecting to hear complaints that the price of our tobacco was too 
high. However, their complaints were not about prices at all. They 
were more concerned about the deteriorating quality of U. S. flue- 
cured tobacco. The Governor was so impressed and concerned 
about the quality problem that he arranged for a group of tobacco 
farm leaders to visit Europe in the fall of 1978 so they could see and 
hear about the problem first hand. 

Prior to these visits to Europe, the N. 0. Department of Agriculture 
had recognized the need for improving the uniformity and grade 
quality of flue-cured tobacco for both the export and domestic 
markets. In order to cope with the problem, a project was initiated 
early in 1978, and a full time position was established under a Fed- 
eral-State matching fund program to work with the problems. 

To get the project going a 1978 graduate from N. C. State Uni- 
versity, Bobby Gentry, who has a double major in Agricultural 
Engineering technology and Vocational Agricultural Education, 
with experience in tobacco, was hired to develop a quality improve- 
ment program. 

It appears that many of the quality complaints by both the export 
and domestic trade are related to the way tobacco is handled 
through the rapidly increasing use of mechanical harvesters and 
bulk curers. Based on a 1978 survey, approximately 39 percent of 
the North Carolina flue-cured crop was harvested mechanically, 
and about 58 percent was cured in bulk curers. 

While mechanically harvested and bulk cured tobacco generally 
is comparable in quality to hand harvested tobacco, it does have a 
tendency to be less uniform, and quite often contains more foreign 
matter, immature and inferior leaves. In many cases this reduces 
the grade quality and also the market value to growers. 

The initial ground workforaquality improvement project was laid 
during the 1978 marketing season by enlisting the cooperation of 
several large mechanized tobacco farmers, who had improvised 
cleaning equipment to remove sand and picking line conveyors to 
provide economical means, for picking suckers, immature and 
inferior leaves, and other foreign matter from the cured tobacco. 
Several pieces of equipment that was in use in 1978 was observed 
and studied for possible improvements, and the operation of each 
was documented on color audio-video movie films and slides, in 
order to develop information on optional equipment already in use 
to improve the preparation of tobacco for market. 

The objective of this project is to assist growers, especially those 
with large mechanized operations, in selecting and establishing a 
system best suited to their individual operations for cleaning and 
picking cured tobacco. Also, smaller growers who still use conven- 



tional stick curing are being encouraged to pick and clean up 
tobacco as it is removed from the sticks and put into burlap sheets 
for market. The effect of this project over the next several years 
should result in an improvement in uniformity and grade quality of 
all tobacco properly handled for market. 

It is fully recognized that the success of this project depends a 
great deal on the response of buying companies in distinguishing 
between tobacco well prepared in clean, uniform lots and that 
poorly prepared by compensating growers for their efforts. Other- 
wise, there will be no incentive for growers to put forth this extra 
effort. 

In preliminary test marketing in 1978, there was evidence that 
buyers will compensate for clean, uniform grades of tobacco. For 
example, in one test two sheets of tobacco straight from the curing 
barn with no preparation to improve it was sold in a regular auction 
sale. The sheets weighted 145 pounds and 99 pounds respectively. 
Each of the two sheets sold for $1.05 per pound. The sales were 
rejected and the individual sheets of tobacco were carried through a 
cleaning and picking process. After being cleaned and picked, the 
heavier sheet weighed 130 pounds and the other one 89 pounds. 
The tobacco was then resold through the auction for $1.45 and 
$1.41 per pound respectively. The picking and cleaning process 
took 3 man-hours or approximately $9.00 worth of labor. Thus, the 
net profit on the two sheets of tobacco amounted to $48.79. 

Of course, the net gains from picking and cleaning will vary with 
each individual barn of tobacco depending upon the condition of 
the tobacco coming from the barn. However, initial work in this 
project indicates that many barns of tobacco can be greatly im- 
proved in grade quality, which will improve the image of U. S. flue- 
cured tobacco and add extra income to growers efforts. 



One version of cleaning and 
picking line conveyor adopted 
to mechanical harvesting and 
big box bulk curing to gettobac- 
co more uniform and improve 
grade quality 




state Market Summary 1978-79 



Tobacco farmers in North Carolina experienced a gratifying 
tobacco season in 1978. Following two years of adverse weather 
conditions, this season's quality crop set a record dollar value and 
average price. 

Many tobacco farmers had a late start in their tobacco season be- 
cause of a shortage of plants and a cool and wet land preparation 
and transplanting period. The remainder of the season was favor- 
able for the tobacco to produce a record breaking crop. The 
tobacco offered for sale showed a dramatic improvement in quality, 
which reflected in a 30 to 60 percent increase in offerings of fair 
quality or better, and also a decrease of 14 to 20 percent in nonde- 
script grades. 

Flue-cured markets in N. C. averaged a record high of $133.45 per 
hundred pounds, an increase of $16.38 per hundred pounds from 
the previous year. Tobacco farmers sold 801,066,042 pounds in 
N. C. markets for a record return to growers of $1,069,038,967. In 
1977, producers sales were 712,341,786 pounds which sold for 
$833,953,533, averaging $117.07 per hundred. 

TYPE 73— Markets in area B began auctions on July 26 and 
operated for 54 sales days, the same as the previous year. Markets 
began closing on October 2nd with final sales being held on 
October 31st. 

Quality was considerably better due mainly to a 14 percent de- 
crease in nondescript grades which reflects the wide participation 
in the bottom 4-leaf program in that area. Fifty four percent of the 
grades were in mature or ripe grades. 

Grade Price Averages were higher in over half the cases, with 
gains from $4-$23 per hundred pounds. However, leaf grades 
showed the smallest gains because of the sharp increase in volume 
of good quality up-stalk leaf tobacco in the 1978 crop. The season 
average price for Type 13 markets was $1 36.1 6 per hundred pounds, 
up $11.32 from the previous years average price. 

Producers sales were 112,734,757 pounds and returned to the 
growers $153,504,232. In 1977, producers sold 96,965,953 pounds 
for $121,056,481. 

Stabilization received 4,936,080 pounds or 4.38 percent of pro- 
ducers sales. In 1977, stabilization received 9,195,168 pounds or 
9.48 percent of producers sales. 

TYPE 72— These markets in Area began auctions on August 1 
and operated for 59 sales days, the same as the previous year. 
Markets began closing on November 6, with final sales on Novem- 
ber 14. 

Quality improved tremendously with 67 percent of grades being 
fair quality and better, and a 22 percent drop in nondescript grades, 
from the 1977 season. 



10 



Because of the abundance of supply, grade price averages for 
better quality leaf tobacco were down generally $1-$5 per hundred 
pounds compared to 1977 when there was very little good leaf avail- 
able. Type 12 markets averaged $134.20 per hundred pounds for the 
season, up $15.68 per hundred pounds from the 1977 average price. 

Producers sales were 437,339,128 pounds which returned to the 
growers $586,891,858. In 1977, 370,468,041 pounds sold for 
$439,097,186. 

Stabilization received 24,742,013 pounds for 5.66 percent of 
producers sales. In 1977, Stabilization received 54,602,218 pounds 
or 14.73 percent of producer sales. 

TYPE 77— These markets opened in stages according to market- 
ing area groupings. Type 1 1 markets included in marketing Area C, 
opened August 1 , Area D, August 8, and Area E, August 1 5. Markets 
began closing on October 18, with final sales being held on No- 
vember 21 , for a season span of 63 sales days, 6 less than the pre- 
vious year. 

Quality of the 1978 crop improved sharply from the preceding 
year, with 63 percent of the crop being fair quality or better and a 
16 percent drop in nondescript grades. Type 11 markets averaged 
$130.94 per hundred pounds, up $19.14 per hundred pounds from 
the previous year. 

Producers sales were 250,992,157 pounds and returned to the 
growers $328,642,877. In 1977, producers sold 244,907,792 pounds 
for a return of $273,799,866. 

Stabilization received 16,700,509 pounds or 6.65 percent of pro- 
ducers sales last season. In 1977, Stabilization received 70,790,749 
pounds or 28.90 percent of producers sales. 

TYPE 37— Burley markets held opening sales on November 21 and 
operated for 22 sales days, with final sales on January 11. 

Quality showed some improvement on North Carolina markets 
over last year even with a drouth during mid-season. 

Grade Price Averages were up on all grades, with increases rang- 
ing from $5-$10 per hundred pounds. North Carolina Type 31 mar- 
kets sold 17,349,406 pounds for producers, averaging $127.31 per 
hundred pounds for a return of $22,231,295. 

The burley stabilization pool received 12.55 percent of producer 
sales under loan this season compared to 11.78 percent the pre- 
vious year. 



11 



Selling Flue-Cured Tobaco 
In 1000 Pound Bales 



During the 1978 Marketing Season, Albert H. Graves, Industrial 
Engineer, U. S. Department of Agriculture, did research on selling 
1000 pound bales of farmer tobacco at the Carolina Warehouse in 
Fuquary-Varina.The 66 participating growers were scheduled to 
bring in generally 4 to 6 sheets of tobacco that would total around 
1000 pounds. 

As the tobacco arrived at the warehouse, it was unloaded by 
chain hoist and lined up on a gravity conveyor. At the end of the 
gravity conveyor, the sheets of tobacco were flipped onto a power 
conveyor belt, and spread out so that it could be inspected and 
graded by an official Government Grader. A sample of tobacco was 
taken from each sheet making up the 1000 pound bale, and placed 
in a plastic bag that stayed with each bale to be used as a represen- 
tative sample of the bale during the auction sale. 

The tobacco was then pressed into a 43" x 43" cube held by 
crossed steel bands with a burlap sheet placed on the bottom and 
top and tied together on the sides by the 4 corners. The bales were 
then weighed and placed on the sale floor. (Seeadjoining picture of 
Bales on sales floor) 

Ten bales were auctioned at each sale. Approximately 185,000 
pounds of baled tobacco was sold during the season foran average 
of $1.33 per pound. The season average for the warehouse was 
$1.30 and the Fuquay market averaged $1.32 per pound. 




12 



SUMMARY OF N. C. DEALERS AND 
WAREHOUSE RESALES — 1978 



Type 



Pounds 



Dollars 



Percentage 
Resale 



TYPE 13 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

TYPE 12 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

TYPE 11 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Total Flue-Cured Resales 

TYPE 31 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Total Burley Resales 



711,293 


$ 835,440 


0.58 


8,462,574 


11,644,012 


6.94 


4,954,166 


$ 6,230,249 


1.06 


23,313,053 


31,428,720 


5.00 


1,403,763 


$ 1,599,149 


0.52 


16,591,032 


22,410,391 


6.17 


55,435,881 


$78,405,640 


6.47 


251.470 


$ 311,781 


1.29 


1,836,571 


2,353,422 


9.45 


2,088,041 


$ 2,665,203 


10.74 



PRODUCER AND GROSS SALES OF FLUE— CURED 
TOBACCO BY STATES 1978 



Producer Sales 
Pounds Average/cwt 



Gross Sales 
Pounds Average/cwt 



North Carolina 


801,066,042 


$133.45 


856,501,923 


$133.47 


Virginia 


117,006,840 


133.67 


122,116,342 


133,72 


South Carolina 


138,465,566 


137.61 


150,336,234 


137.74 


Georgia 


126,362,280 


142.35 


139,112,143 


142.02 


Florida 


18,925,961 


145.28 


200,997,877 


144.60 


Total 


1,201,826,689 


$135.07 


1,289,064,591 


135.10 



13 



FLUE-CURED MOVEMENT IN AND OUT 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 



N.C. Tobacco Sold Out of State Out of State Tobacco Sold In N.C. 

(Pounds) (Pounds) 



1978 1977 1978 1977 



Virginia 22,890,000 19,874,000 6,661,000 6,687,000 

South Carolina 5,584,000 4,869,000 13,121,000 11,485,000 

Total 28,474,000 24,743,000 19,782,000 18,172,000 



BURLEY TOBACCO MOVEMENT IN AND OUT 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 



N.C. Tobacco Sold Out of State 




OutofStateTobaccoSoldlnN.C. 


(Pounds) 






(Pounds) 






1978 


1977 


1978 


1977 


Tennessee 


4,461,270 


5,301,893 


665,957 


682,511 


Virginia 


20,181 


55,995 


1,110,380 


1,230,689 


W. Virginia 


— 


— 


11,613 


18,005 


Georgia 


— 


— 


28,170 


44,835 


South Carolina 


— 


— 


734 


272 


Total 


4,481,451 


5,357,888 


1,816,854 


1,976,312 



14 



FLUE-CURED STABILIZATION RECEIPTS 
BY TYPES AND STATES — 1978 



Type 



Producer Stabilization Percentage 

Sales (lbs) Receipts (lbs) Stab. Received 



Va. Total 




11 


117,006,840 


9,021,520 


7.71 


N.C. 




11 


250,992,157 


16,700,509 


6.65 


N.C. 




12 


437,339,128 


24,742,013 


5.66 


N.C. 




13 


112,734,757 


4,936,080 


4.38 


N.C. Total 


11 


-13 


801,066,042 


55,400,122 


6.92 


S.C. Total 




13 


136,465,566 


4,218,744 


3.09 


Ga. Total 




14 


126,362,280 


3,845,970 


3.04 


Fla. Total 




14 


18,925,961 


126,457 


0.67 


Total All Types 


11 


-14 


1,201,826,689 


63,591,293 


5.29 



BURLEY STABILIZATION RECEIPTS 
FOR N.C. AND TOTAL U.S. — 1978-79 



State 



Type 



Producer Stabilization Percentage 

Sales (lbs) Receipts (lbs) Stab. Received 



N.C. 
U.S. Total 



31 
31 



18,456,006 
591,981,584 



2,177,942 
67,589,541 



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NORTH CAROLINA BURLEY CROPS 
1930-1978* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


, 15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1.050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


1 1 ,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.60 


1959 


9,800 


2,060 


20,188 


11,426 


56.60 


1960 


9,500 


1,940 


18,430 


12,016 


65.20 


1961 


10,400 


2,090 


21,736 


14,346 


66.00 


1962 


1 1 ,000 


2,185 


24,035 


14,421 


60.00 


1963 


1 1 ,000 


2,285 


25,135 


13,573 


54.00 


1964 


9,700 


2,165 


21.000 


12,054 


57.40 


1965 


8,900 


2,030 


18,067 


12,159 


67.30 


1966 


7,900 


2,320 


18,328 


12,371 


67.50 


1967 


7,800 


2,010 


15,678 


11,037 


70.40 


1968 


7,900 


2,385 


18,842 


13,868 


73.60 


1969 


7,900 


2,570 


20,303 


13,928 


68.60 


1970 


7,300 


2,545 


18,579 


13,544 


72.90 


1971 


7,000 


2,065 


14,455 


11,535 


79.80 


1972 


7,700 


2.450 


18,865 


14,658 


77.70 


1973 


7,500 


2,440 


18,300 


16,781 


91.70 


1974 


8,000 


2,370 


18,960 


20,477 


106.70 


1975 


9,500 


2,440 


23,180 


23,736 


102.40 


1976 


9,000 


2,200 


19,800 


21,701 


109.60 


1977 


9,600 


2,450 


23,520 


26,389 


112.20 


"1978 


8,500 


2,400 


20,400 


26,112 


128.00 



*Source N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service 
•"Preliminary for 1978 

Note; Since 1965, production is pounds produced and does not reflect pounds not sold 
or pounds carried forward to next season. 



NORTH CAROLINA FLUE-CURED CROPS 
1930-1978* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


177,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368.040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,508 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,441 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


50,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1,718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959 


458,500 


1,533 


702,942 


407,055 


57.90 


1960 


457,500 


1,836 


839,870 


512,731 


61.10 


1961 


463,000 


1,797 


832,215 


541 ,468 


65.10 


1962 


483,000 


1,890 


912,810 


549,594 


60.20 


1963 


460,500 


1,999 


920,660 


535,622 


58.18 


1964 


416,000 


2,282 


949,450 


549,875 


57.90 


1965 


375,000 


1,840 


690,050 


442,796 


64.20 


1966 


409,500 


1,859 


761 ,360 


506,605 


66.50 


1967 


395,400 


2,071 


818,997 


523,809 


64.00 


1968 


350,500 


1,850 


648,533 


430,613 


66.45 


1969 


378,500 


1,838 


695,665 


502,305 


72.20 


1970 


383,800 


2,076 


796,941 


571,211 


71.70 


1971 


339,000 


2,102 


712,960 


552,544 


77.50 


1972 


332,000 


1,993 


661,520 


566,267 


85.60 


1973 


376,000 


2,111 


793,615 


700,410 


88.30 


1974 


390,000 


1,975 


770,260 


813,427 


105.60 


1975 


470,000 


1,987 


933,815 


931,779 


99.80 


1976 


439,000 


2,012 


883,130 


977,736 


110.70 


1977 


383,000 


1,883 


721 ,005 


843,277 


117.00 


"1978 


390,000 


2,120 


826,920 


1,826,920 


133.30 



'Source N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service 
"Preliminary for 1978 

Note: Since 1965, production is pounds produced and does not reflect pounds not sold 
or pounds carried forward to the next season. 



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21 



N. C. BURLEY TOBACCO ALLOTMENTS* — 1979 





Number 


Base 


Effective 




County 


Farms 


Poundage 


Poundage 


Rank 


Alleghany 


622 


665,699 


692,126 


9 


Ashe 


2,766 


2,693,726 


3,262,413 


4 


Avery 


258 


296,725 


371,731 


10 


Buncombe 


3,053 


3,325,046 


4,145,568 


2 


Burke 


12 


7,150 


14,121 


21 


Caldwell 


12 


7,800 


16,268 


20 


Cherokee 


192 


144,617 


243,588 


14 


Clay 


252 


179,003 


269,904 


12 


Cleveland 


9 


5,331 


10,662 


22 


Davidson 


2 


1,587 


3,174 


26 


Gaston 


2 


799 


1,598 


27 


Graham 


712 


681,693 


988,903 


8 


Granville 


1 


288 


576 


29 


Haywood 


1,950 


2,097,636 


2,536,659 


5 


Henderson 


128 


82,762 


145,323 


16 


Jackson 


232 


200,658 


377,741 


11 


McDowell 


59 


42,507 


80,932 


18 


Macon 


274 


164,015 


298,556 


13 


Madison 


3,153 


5,133,368 


5,657,540 


1 


Mitchell 


998 


1,268,831 


1,888,004 


7 


Polk 


5 


2,276 


2,381 


25 


Rutherford 


60 


31,075 


60,108 


19 


Stokes 


1 


472 


944 


28 


Surry 


7 


2,824 


4,299 


24 


Swain 


150 


110,839 


205,046 


15 


Transylvania 


82 


50,600 


90,164 


17 


Watauga 


1,787 


1,910,020 


2,226,486 


6 


Wilkes 


4 


2,925 


4,802 


23 


Yancey 


1,957 
18,740 


2,718,046 
21,828,318 


3,527,347 
27,126,964 




TOTAL 


1-29 



'Source: USDA Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service 



22 



NORTH CAROLINA TOBACCO WAREHOUSES AND OPERATORS 
BY TYPE AND MARKETS— 1978 



TYPE 13 



Chad bourn 



Jimmy Green— Jimmy Green 

Producers — Horace Cox, Kenneth O. Ray, Jack Cox 

Chadbourn— J. G. McNeill, Mgr. 

Clarkton 

New Clarkton— Maynard Talley, E. C. Wood 

Clarkton Farmers Exchange, Inc.— Howard Watts, Sr., President 

Bright Leaf— Jimmy Green 

Fair Bluff 

Fair Bluff — E. D. Meares, Howard Enzor 

New Farmers— Roger Hammond, Leo Hayes, A. E. Carmichael, Jr., Sarah Bullock 
Planters Job., Inc.— Carl Mears, Sr., T. C. Parham, Henry McNeill, C. T. Waddell 
Powell's— B. A. Powell, Albert H. Powell 

Fairmont 

Planters — Mitchell — Harry Mitchell, Jack Mitchell, W. M. Daniel, N. B. Tuck 

Twin State — Landis Joyce, Lynn Floyd, R. Hoke Smith, Jr., J. Garth Lewis 

Big Five-Peoples — Carl Britt, Beasley Strickland, Danny Nance, Kenneth Hardin, 

R. Clemon Britt 
Big Brick— A. D. Lewis, Jr. 
Carolina— A. W. McDaniel 
Holiday-Frye — Ernest H. Frye, Joseph W. Holliday, John Monroe Holliday, 

Joe Frye 
Liberty— Landis Joyce, Lynn Floyd, R. Hoke Smith, Jr., J. Garth Lewis 
Tobacco Land— Ralph P. Britt, J. Q. Rogers 
Square Deal— Chan L. Smith, Mrs. W. G. Bassett 
Growers— Horace Sutton, President 

Fayetteville 

Big Farmers — W. Clifton McNeill, James Gillis, Kathryn Morgan, Scottie Godwin 

Lumberton 

Star— Russell Teater, David Stephenson 

Lumbee— Ralph Hunt, Howard Oxendine 

Smith-Dixie— Jack Pait, Andy Pait 

Cooperative— L. D. West, Mgr. 

Hedgepeth— A. G. Thornton, Jr., E. H. Collins 

Liberty— R. H. Livermore, Jr., R. H. Livermore, III, H. D. Goode, Mgr. 

Carolina — J. L. Townsend, Jr., James Johnson 

First American Cooperative — Clint Locklear, Mgr. 



23 



Tabor City 

R. C. Coleman — R. C. Coleman, Sr. & Jr., Joe Coleman, Joey Coleman, 

Ricky Coleman 

New Tabor — H. B. Buffkin, Jr., Earl McDaniels, Milton demons 
Planters— Don B. Watson 

Whiteville 

Crutchfield's— Ernest Smith, Joe T. Smith, Gaither E. Crutchfield, Mgr., 

Jimmy Dale Smith 
Columbus County— A. D. Gray, Jr., A. D. Gray, III, R. Coke Gray 
Lea's Big Dixie— W. Townes Lee, Jr., A. O. King, Jr., Wray King 
Golden Leaf— Jimmy D. Smith, Ernest W. Smith 
Nelson's Jim D. Smith, Milton Gore 
Moore's— C. E. Jeffcoat, Jack E. Burroughs 
Smith's — Ernest Smith, Joe T. Smith 
Liberty— J. Water Hooks 
United Producers Cooperative— Ashley Wynne, Mgr., James T. Campbell, Pres. 



Type 12 



Ahoskie 



Basnight's — Harold G. Veazey, Herbert Jenkins, Jr., Lyman L. Wilkins, Jr., 
Farmers— Shirley S. Pierce, W. M. Odom, Wilbur Hobgood 

Clinton 

Farmers— L. D. Starling 

Carolina— L. D. Starling, Garrett Strickland, Mrs. N. L. Daughtry, 

Bright Leaf— Albert G. Thornton, Jr. 

Ross— Clarence Kirven, Jr., Ellen R. Kirven, C. Ross Kirven 

Sampson— Carlton B. Barefoot, Leslie S. Hobbs 

Barwick-Butler — C. Marion Butler, Hugh B. Barwick, James H. Butler 

Dunn 

Big Four— O. G. Calhoun, John G. Calhoun, Harold UpChurch 

Lee's-Planter— Leiand Lee 

New Dunn— Ray A. Owen, Jr., Dan Honeycutt 

Tri-County— John H. Wall 

Tew's— Roy V. Tew 

Farmers — Wade Ashworth, Cleo Jones, Joseph K. Adams 

Farmville 

Bell's— R. A. Bell & Brothers 

Pierce — Robert P. Pierce 

Planters— H. D. Pegram, Ralph C. Tucker, Jr., William O. Newell, Mark Mozingo, 

B. S. Correll 
Farmers— Charles Sutton, Jr. 
New Blue— W. A. Allen 
Worthington — Chester Worthington, Jr. 



24 



Goldsboro 

Farmers— Rudy Hill, Elaine Stanley 

Victory— Richard A. Gray 

Carolina— Durwood M. Price 

Gold Leaf— W. W. Barnes, Willie Strickland 

Big Three— Max A. Parrish, Max Futrell, N. C. Newman 

Big Brick— J. R. Musgrave, Jr. 

Planters— Cecil Bryan, Phillip Bryan, Luby Bryan 

Gurley— Dean Gurley 

Greenville 

Raynor, Forbes & Clark— W. C. Clark, Jr., P. R. Harrington, III, Norman S. Porter, 

W. C. Clark, III, Robert A. Halstead 
New Greenville— Hugh Hardee, Jr., Wayne Stokes, Rob Jones, Jr. 
Cannon's— William T. Cannon, Jr., T. R. Cannon, Samuel Adams, 

Sammy Harrell, Jr. 
Keel's — J. A. Worthington, J. B. Worthington, Fenner Allen, A. T. Venters 
New Carolina — William H. Mills, Laddie Avery 
Growers— J. L. Tripp 

Star-Planters— F. Harding Sugg, James C. Mills, Alton Haddock, Ralph Davenport 
Hudson— W. Larry Hudson 
Farmers— H. L. Watson, T. J. Warren 
New Independent— T. W. Pruitt, W. A. Pruitt, W. E. Pruit, J. B. Belcher, 

Jack S. Warren 

Kinston 

Central — W. I. Herring, Sr., W. I. Herring, Jr., Dennis M. Bailey 

New Central— W. I. Herring, Sr., W. I. Herring, Jr., Dennis M. Bailey 

Farmers— New Dixie— John T. Jenkins, Sr. & Jr., L. B. Jenkins, II 

Growers— Robert T. Gray, P. G. Sutton, Jr., 

Gold Leaf— R. E. Wooten, Jr., William L. Davis, Mgr. 

H. & H-D.W. Hodges, Jr., Virgil Harper 

Knott's— H. Graham Knott, W. E. Brewer 

Robersonville 

Gray-Red Front-Central— Vernon L. Hardee, Harry T. Gray, Jack Sharp 
Hardee — H. Edwin Lee 

Rocky Mount 

Cobb & Carlton— W. E. Cobb, Jr., J. C. Carlton 

Farmers, Inc.-I & 2— George B. Watson, Alfred Hicks, Joe Coleman 

Fenner's, Inc. — Mrs. Mary Ellen Parker, Julian B. Fenner, William E. Fenner, II 

Planters-Cooperative— S. S. Edmondson, Jr. 

Works— R. J. Works, Jr., A. B. Raynor 

Peoples — Guy E. Barnes, W. Eugene Simmons 

Smith's— Jimmie D. Smith, Jr. 

Smithfield 

Stephenson— Jerry Joe Stephenson, Joe G. Stephenson 

Farmers— W. T. Kennedy, N. Leo Daughtry 

Riverside-Planters— Gilbert D. Stephenson, Helen C. Stephenson 

Carolina Farmers— M. A. Morgan, Toby Lee, Mgr. 

Gold Leaf— R. A. Pearce, Sr., R. A. Pearce, Jr. 

Wallace— Robert F. Wallace, Lawrence H. Wallace, II 

25 



Tarboro 

Clark's— George L, Proctor, W. G. Clark, W. S. Clark 

Victory— William V. Leggett, Margaret Y. Leggett 

Farmers 1 & 2— Walter F. Walker, Mrs. W. G. Maples, Fred L. Walston 

Wallace 

Hussey's— Joseph D. Bryant 

Sheffield's— Homer M. Boney, Jr., Wendell Teachey, John Sheffield 

Blanchard & Farrior— R. H. Lanier 

New Duplin— Hilton Maready 

Washington 

Bright Belt— Tommy N. Cox, Harry L. Roberts 

Sermons & Douglas— Wayland J. Sermons, James C. Douglas 

Hassell's — Malcolm P. Hassell 

Gravely's— W. A. Gravely, Sr., C. Stephen Gravely, Bennie Ray Hopkins 

Wendell 

Farmers— James H. Bryan 

Northside— Norman Dean, C. P. Southerland 

Liberty— H. H. Eddins 

Banner— E. C. Rogers, Carson Jones 

Growers— Clyde C. Holmes 

Planters — Jessie L. Raybon 

Williamston 

Rogers— C. Urbin Rogers, J. Rossell Rogers, John R. Rogers, John M. Rogers, 
New Dixie— J. Elmo Lilley, J. Elmo Lilley, Jr., William C. Lilley, Stephen C. Lilley 

Wilson 

Big Dixie — W. Cecil Thompson, W. C. Edmundson 

Liberty— J. T. Worthington, R. D. Oldham, W. Cecil Moore 

Barnes— Thurman G. Barnes, Randy Barnes 

Centre Brick— S. M. Cozart, Fred M. Eagles, U. H. Cozart 

The Producers— Thurman B. Pate, William Liles, James B. Belcher, ElmaS. Farmer 

Clark— Jesse Harris 

Bob Clark— Charles R. Clark 

Gold Leaf— J. R. Boykin, Jr., James W. Pittman 

Wainwright's 1 & 2— George L. Wainwright 

Smith's A-B-C & New Planters # 1— S. Grady Deans, John F. Deans, 

Louise S. Deans 
Growers — Clifford B. Aycock, Mgr. 

Windsor 

Planters— C. B. Griffin, Burges U. Griffin 

Farmers — William B. Davis 

Center— Jerry H. Shackelford, J. R. Freshwater 



26 



Type 11 



Aberdeen 



Planters— W. Fentress Phillips 

New Aberdeen— J. A. Richardson, Mary Jo Hicks, Mary Richardson 

Gallimore & Lambeth— W. C. Gallimore, P. P. Gallimore, Mike Lambeth 

Carthage 

McConnell's— George W. Mabe, Paul Wilson 
Farmers— W. M. Carter, Jr., W. M. Carter, Sr. 
Carthage Cooperative— Frank Bryant, Mgr. 
Victory— Earl J. Ennis, E. C, Layton 

Durham 

Liberty— Walker S. Stone 

Planters— J. M. Talley, R. L. Dale, Durwood Thomas, Bobby L. Thomas 

CCF #1— James K. Spell, Mgr. 

Star Brick— William W. Cozart, Willie L. Currin, Morris W. Currin 

Roycroft-Currin— H. Randolph Currin 

Ellerbe 

Richmond Co. — Mike Long, Sidney Wise 

Farmers— Bobby D. Oldham, William C. Moore, Joe Langdon 

Fuquay-Varina 

Carolina — Larry C. Knott, Douglass E. Knott 

Roberts— Nellie C. Roberts 

Planters— Billy Adams, J. C. Adams, W. C. Lipscomb 

Fuquay-Cooperative — Leo Matthews, Mgr. 

New Deal— Daniel B. Brisson 

Gold Leaf— J. W. Dale, Jr., Jimmy L. Tilley, Leroy J. Stephenson 

Henderson 

High Price-Big Banner— C. E. Jeffcoat, R. E. Tanner 
Farmers & Alston's— Walter J. Alston, Jr. 
Liberty— G. T. Robertson, S. E. Southerland 
Gold Leaf— James H. O'Brien 
Ellington's— John A. Ellington, F. H. Ellington 
Big Dollar— M. L. Hight, T. E. Barham 

Louisburg 

Ford— Charles E. Ford, Charles E. Ford, Jr. 

Star— James D. Speed, R. C. Pearce 

Big Franklin— James B. Cottrell, Donald Cottrell, S. T. Cottrell 



27 



Oxford 

Yeargin — W. W. Yeargin 

Mitchell— David J. Mitchell 

Granville — Roy Crews 

Fleming — Dan T. Currin, E. C. Finch 

Johnson-High Price-Owen— C. R. Watkins, Jr., Joseph C. Hamme, 

John S. Watkins, Jr., Thomas J. Currin, C. B. Wilkins, M. A. Goods 
The Farmers — James C. Blackwell, Winston Pruitt, James Belcher, Tom Belcher, 

Frank Belcher, Mrs. James W. Satterwhite, James Frazier 

Sanford 

Farmers Coop. — Gilbert P. Matthews, Mgr. 
Castleberry— C. N. Castleberry, Jr. 
Morgan's— E. L. Morgan 
Twin City— W. M. Carter, Sr., T. W. Mansfield 

Warrenton 

Centre— Tommy Wagner, Edward M. Moody, W. Edward Radford 

Farmers— H. J. Carter, G. H. Limer 

Currin— W. J. Renn, Mrs. Betty E. Currin 

High Dollar— M. P. Carroll, C. G. Stainback 

Thompson's— Mrs. C. E. Thompson, V. T. Grissom, Glenn R. Riggan 

Boyd's — Owen Robertson, Jr. - 

Burlington 

Newman & Robertson — N. C. Newman, Joe F. Robertson, Jr. 
Farmers— W. N. McCauley 
Carolina— C. R. McCauley, III 

Greensboro 

Coleman Greensboro— R. C. Coleman, Sr., & Jr., Joe Coleman, Joey Coleman, 

Ricky Coleman 
Guilford— Harold Ensley, W. B. Hull 

Madison 

Carolina— Lee McCollum, John Neal, C. J. Corn 

New Madison — Ray White, Thomas Johnson, Paul Covington, Charles H. Joyce, 

Osley Joyce 
Sharpe-Smith-Farmers — S. H. Price, Fred S. Williams, R. Jack Neal 

Mebane 

Piedmont— W. L. Hopkins, Jr., J. M. Hopkins 
Farmers— Jule R. Allen 

IVIt. Airy 

Dixie & New Farmers— Harold Y. Hodges, Sr. & Jr., Fred E. Chilton, 

F. V. Dearmin, Boyd Cain 
Hunter's — Dean Hunter, Max M. Hunter 
Gold Leaf— Robert L. Nichols 
Carolina-Virginia Farmers Coop., Thomas Marshall, Mgr. 



28 



ReidsvJIe 

New Farmers— G. E. Smith, Steve Smith, S. L. Fairchild, Phillip Carter 
North State Farmers Coop.— Albert L. Robertson, Mgr. 
Smothers— T. Garland Smothers 
Sands-Leader— Larry Sands 

Roxboro 

Hyco— Frank J. Hester, Jr., Frank J. Hester, III 

Winstead— L. Dan Winstead 

Growers— Roy S. Carver, T. Elmo Mitchell 

Planters— T. O. Pass, Jr. 

CCF Farmers— Lindsey T. Wagstaff, Mgr. 

Four Acres — H. W. Winstead, H. W. Winstead, Jr. 

Stoneville 

Joyce's— Otis P. Joyce, Sr., William R. Joyce, Otis P. Joyce, Jr. James L. Albert 
Piedmont— Clarence Peeples, R. N. Linville, Robert H. Rakestraw, 
C. Garland Rakestraw 

Winston-Salem 

Carolina-Star — Kenneth Chilton 

Growers— J. T. Harris, C. R. Harris 

Pepper's — Charlie F. Hutchens, Dan Hutchens 

Old Belt Farmers Coop., Inc. — Robert S. White, Mgr. 

New Piedmont— Christopher T. Rosser, James D. East, W. V. Neal 

Cook's— D. L. Cook, C. B. Strickland, H. Penn Thomas 

Taylor's — Lawrence E. Pope 

Big Winston — Jack Carter, Taylor Carter 

Yadkinville 

Miller— J. A. Miller, Sr., J. A. Miller, Jr. 
Northwest N. C. Farmers— R. A. Owens, C. Kenneth Gray 
Yadkin County— B. G. Wall, Richard T. Flinchum, Edwin Freeman 
Cook's— Gilbert Cook, Locksley Hall 



BURLEY BELT 

Asheville 

Day's— Charlie Day 
Dixie Burley— R. A. Owen 
Planters— J. W. Stewart 

Boone 

Mountain Burley — Joe Coleman, Joey Coleman, Ricky Coleman Lavelle Coleman 

West Jefferson 

Tri-State Burley— Rex Taylor 

Farmers Burley— Mary Jo Hicks, J. T. Worthington 



29 



TOBACCO ORGANIZATIONS AND AGENCIES 



The Tobacco Institute 
1776 K Street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20006 

Tobacco Growers Information Committee 
P. O. Box 12046 
Raleigh, N. C. 27605 



P. O. Box 10603 
Raleigh, N. C. 27605 



Tobacco Associates 
1101-17th St. N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20036 

Tobacco Tax Council 
P. O. Box 8269 
Richmond, Va. 23226 

Bright Belt Warehouse Assoc. 
P. O. Box 12005 
Raleigh, N. C. 27605 

Leaf Tobacco Exporters Assoc. & 
Tobacco Association of United States 
3716 National Drive 
Raleigh, N. C. 27612 

Flue-Cured Coop. Stabilization Corp. 
P. O. Box 12300 
Raleigh, N. C. 27605 

USDA Agricultural Marketing Service 

P. O. Box 27846 Grading Service 

Raleigh, N. C. 27611 Market News 

USDA-ASCS 
P. O. Box 27327 
Raleigh, N. C. 27611 

USDA-Agricultural Research 
P. O. Box 5906 
Raleigh, N. C. 27606 

N. C. Agri-Business Council 
Suite 211 Koger Executive Center 
Raleigh, N. C. 27612 

N. C. State University Extension Service 
P. O. Box 5155 
Raleigh, N. C. 27606 

N. C. Tobacco Foundation 
NCSU Box 5067 
Raleigh, N. C. 27607 

N. C. Department of Agriculture 

P. O. Box 27647 Tobacco Affairs Section 

Raleigh, N. C. 27611 Weights & Measure 



(202) 457-4800 
(800) 424-9876 

(919) 832-3766 



(202) 659-1160 
(919) 821-7670 

(804) 282-4275 



(919) 828-8988 



(919) 782-5151 



(919) 821-4560 



(919) 755-4551 
(919) 755-4550 

(919) 755-4294 



(919) 737-3101 



(919) 782-4063 



(919) 737-3331 



(919) 737-2846 



(919) 733-7125 
(919) 733-6152 
(919) 733-3313 



30 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

James A. Graham: Commissioner 
Ex-Officio Chairman 

L. P. Britton, Jr Ahoskie 

Dr. Ben Harrington Raleigh 

Evelyn M. Hill Edneyville 

Donald R. Kincaid Lenoir 

Sam McLawhorn Grifton 

Henry Smith Farmville 

Fred Snow Dobson 

James L. Sutherland Laurinburg 

Windell L. Talley Stanfield 

Sherrill Williams Newton Grove 



31 



DOMESTIC TAX PAID CIGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS 1978 




TOTAL DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION 
616 BILLION CIGARETTES 



32